History of the Wobbly

The legendary Wobbly Barn opened its wooden doors in December 1963 and quickly became the foundation of Killington’s renowned dining and night life experience. Created by two fraternity brothers and their friend, Jack Giguere, Tom Standish and George Stevens. The crew purchased the “Old Bates Homestead” and constructed a three-story wobbly edifice with collected pieces from ten old barns across New England topped off by the wiggly, wobbly lettering on the outside of the building.

On the celebrated opening night, the first steaks were sizzled by Chef Thomas Harris and the rickety, rustic walls shook to the rock and roll sounds of the Run-a-Rounds and the Wobbly Barn’s tradition began. Three years later, Bob “Tuna” Evans walked through the Wobbly door for the first time, originally hired as a bartender (considered the worst bartender Killington has ever seen before or since), turned out to be the most influential person in the Wobbly Barn’s history.

Hired as the General Manager in 1980, Evans was known as a tireless promoter and extremely detailed orientated, which made the Wobbly Barn the number one après spot in Killington for the last 47 years. Gruff, tough and downright stubborn, Evans did what "just made sense". After retiring in January 1998, Bob still stops by from time to time to make sure that "his" building is running up to standard and to advise as well as harass the current staff.

It has been over 45 years since the Wobbly Barn opened and it still stands with shaky architecture, untouched by modern design. While the walls continue to rock, one thing those three college boys learned back in the early 60’s is still true today: It's really the people who make the Wobbly Barn so special. Without the many people who have worked here over the years, the people who have visited us and became our friends, we wouldn't be the Wobbly Barn...we'd just be an old barn. We hope that Mr. Giguere, Mr. Standish and Mr. Stevens would be proud.